The MEK lost the appeal court against the son of Massoud Rajavi

Yesterday, on July 3rd 2022, Mohammad Rajavi, son the leader of the Mujahedin-e Khalq published a post in his Facebook account on his victory in the trial the MEK agents had set up against him.
Mohammad, former child soldier of the MEK is the son of Massoud Rajavi and Ashraf Rabiee. He left the MEK after the group was relocated in Albania. He moved to Norway where he built up a new life independent from the MEK and its cause. This led to judiciary adventures that the MEK created for him.

Mohammad Rajavi did not obey the MEK’s demands to condemn critics of the group such as Iraj Mesdaghi. Thus, he was sued by his employer who is a former Norwegian politician and a paid activist for the MEK. Mohammad who had previously spoke out about the fraudulent tactics of the MEK against its former members, published his recent comment a few months after he won the appeal court against his employer in March.

Mohammad Rajavi alias Mostafa

“According to the court judgment, the employer and his masters in the Mujahedin organization once more suffered severe failure, much harder than what they lost in the district court,” the son of Massoud Rajavi writes. “The appeal court not only confirmed the verdict of the district court but also the employer was sentenced to pay a much heftier amount of money as penalty.”

The significant point in this lawsuit, is the heavy expenses that the MEK spent to hire attorneys, witnesses and lobbyists. This was seemingly considered by the MEK as an important lawsuit on the international level. “The MEK mobilized all its campaign to defeat me in the court of appeal at any cost,” he asserts. “To inform you on the hysteric campaign the MEK launched against me, I just let you know that the expenses for the lawyers that the MEK hired mounted to 200 thousand euros!”

Heavy sums were also paid to forge reports against Mohammad Rajavi. He estimated that the costs of forging the fake documents might have been mounted to 50 thousand euros. Moreover, the MEK intended to send five of his notorious commanders and two of his well-paid lobbyists to testify against Mohammad in the court but the Norwegian judge find it unnecessary and irrelevant. “The court heard the testimonies of only two of them, farzin Hashemi and Robert Torricelli,” Mohammad writes.

According to Mohammad Rajavi, the entire sum the MEK spent on his court case including the bribes they paid the Norwegian employer and former US senator Robert Torricelli mounts to half a million euros. The lavish campaign that the MEK launched to defeat the son of Massoud was even bizarre to the chief judge. “One of the topics pointed out by the chief judge of the appeal court was that why the MEK was so much involved in this lawsuit between the employer and the employee,” Mohammad states.

To answer the crucial question, he writes that this court case was a matter of honor for the MEK leaders, particularly after former child soldiers of the group began to reveal facts on the human right violations taken place inside the MEK camps. The revelations of numerous former child soldiers of the MEK were made following the publication of an article based on the life experience of Amin Golmaryami in the German magazine De Seit. Amin Golmaryami and the journalist Louisa Hommerich were eventually sued by the MEK but the MEK slot that court too.

Mohammad Rajavi was among those former child soldiers of the MEK who spoke out against his father’s cult of personality in Club House.

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