MKO Abusing a Nation’s Championship

The championship of the Iraqi national soccer team in the Asian Cup tournament was a praiseworthy feat and the Iraqis burst into a celebration of joy and happiness despite the dominant internal chaos that is tearing their country apart. The championship fosters hope that the country has the potentialities to overcome its overwhelming plights inflicted by insurgent and terrorist groups, majority of who are the accomplices of the ousted Saddam’s regime. But can a national sports team’s success or failure signify efficiency and inefficiency of a country’s nationally elected government and parliament to steer a country that is mainly dominated by alien forces?

That is the way MKO, a proscribed terrorist group that enjoys support of the US forces in Iraq, looks at it much because the group is at odds with the Iraqi government over its decisiveness to expel the terrorist group from Iraq. Once forming close alliance with Saddam against Iran, MKO acted also as his loyal mercenaries in suppression of uprising Iraq dissidents. After the fall of the dictator, in a shift of position the group claimed to be standing beside the Iraqi people in a unified front to secure its stay in Iraq. As it is naturally a terrorist group whose strategy of struggle is founded on armed and violent warfare, it preferred to make coalition with Iraqi insurgent groups.

Alireza Jafarzadeh, MKO’s member who has established a close cooperation with Fox News, in his recent article released by Fox News takes advantage of the Iraq soccer team’s championship and attempts to disparage the legally elected government of Nouri al-Maliki and the parliament. He makes wild accusations against the advocates of the nation and country;

Iraqis are wondering: if 11 young men can instill a sense of unity by playing soccer, can the government of Nouri al-Maliki and the 275 politicians elected to steer Iraq to a brighter future achieve the same result? The people are particularly wary of the government as more evidence surfaces suggesting closer ties between Iraqi officials and the secret torture centers, as well as the death squads meant to heighten sectarian violence.

At the time when there is a nationally unified call for a terror-free Iraq led by a nationally supported government that is determined to uproot terrorism and violence, MKO’ headquarters in Camp Ashraf has turned into a den of conspiracy where terrorist gangs meet to plot. As Jafarzadeh refers to:

In mid June, as many as 10,000 Iraqi tribal leaders and local residents, mostly from the volatile Diyala Province, gathered in the headquarters of the main Iranian opposition in Ashraf City, which is also in the Diyala Province. At this event, which combined speeches and entertainment and was called "solidarity for peace and freedom in Iraq," a statement signed by 450 thousand inhabitants of Diyala called for unity of all Iraqi ranks against foreign intervention, especially that of the Iranian regime.

In an immediate move to confront gatherings of the terrorists, the Iraqi government banned Iraqis’ traffic to Camp Ashraf. No doubt, the people of a country can came together as a whole nation and live peacefully. But the problem lies in the fact that neither can they coexist with the parasites of an ousted regime nor the unwelcome guests consent to the will of a nation to desert the soil once they were housed to conspire against the two nations. MKO in its struggle to survive not only claim a position similar to that Iraqi citizens with all granted rights but also postures as being in the vanguard of accomplishing democracy for Iraqi people. That is what Jafarzadeh cleverly purports in his article by advertising Camp Ashraf as a place of amalgamating solidarity and coalition:

Iraqi sports and music, as well as the large social and political gathering in Ashraf City, are living proof that Iraqis from all political and religious backgrounds can live, work and thrive in harmony.

For sure, hardly any of those, although some unknowingly, who participate in Camp Ashraf’s gathering consider the interests of the nation since a man is known by the company he keeps. These are explicit evidences of MKO’s interfering in Iraq’s political and social sectors to destabilize the solidarity between the nation and the state. Fortunately, Iraqi people and government are well aware of MKO’s masqueraded nature and the objectives it strives to fulfil and are dedicated to work together to overcome problems. The existing anarchy is nothing but the outcome of the negligence of the alien forces that provide for the prowl of the terrorist groups and hold over the will of the nation to be fulfilled.

Sattar Orangi – Mojahedin.ws – August 7, 2007

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