Women Warriors of the Mujahedeen Khalq. Are They Terrorists, a Cult or Both?

My uncle had been in the Royal Airforce as a pilot during WWII. He never worked as a commercial pilot, opting instead to teach, but always an adventurous soul answered an ad in a British newspaper, placed there by the Shah of Iran.

At the time the Shah was looking for experienced pilots to join his military. Then in his 40’s, my uncle wasn’t exactly in fighting shape, but if the stories are true, he joined the Shah’s team, flying his family and government officials around.

My aunt didn’t move to Iran, and instead my uncle ‘commuted’ back and forth. He loved it at first, until the escalating violence in the late 70’s; when westerners, especially the British and Americans, became favourite targets.

One afternoon at a BBQ celebrating some kind of holiday, an explosive device was thrown into the crowd and my uncle was badly injured.

He left the country just prior to the Shah being forced into exile, and retired to New Zealand, seeking a little solace after several frightening years.

This might seem like a strange segue into a story about an army of women, but if the accounts by my mother are true, it was their army, the Mujahedeen Khalq; who were responsible.

I don’t know, but it speaks to the volatility of a country that has seen a lot of conflict.

I first started researching this group when I learned that Jason Kenney had spoke at one of their rallies. When it was pointed out to him that they were on Canada’s Terrorist list, he shrugged it off, claiming not to know. I thought it might have something to do with Christians United for Israel.

Though the People’s Mujahedin of Iran sound more like a cult, I thought the story of these women was rather interesting. They are still on a terrorist list, but that may change soon. After reading this, I’m not convinced it should.

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