Can Criminals Condemn Executions?

Reported by NCRI’s Foreign Affairs Committee, sympathizers and supporters of Mojahedin-e Khalq Organization (MKO/MEK) are on their week-long rally in Geneva and Copenhagen condemning the recent wave of executions in Iran. Of course, the people who take part in these rallies might have never done anything wrong against their fellow citizens or violated anyone’s right dishonestly, but chanting on behalf of a globally proscribed group whose leaders have their hands dipped in the blood of many innocent Iranian is different.

Once failing in their struggle to assume power in Iran, Mojahedin announced an armed warfare against the newly established Iranian theocratic government; the sole victims of this offensive campaign were Iranian people. The group was given power, money, arms and bases in a bid to overthrow the theocratic rule and establish a secular state. Neither have the Iranian people chosen the group as their representative for freedom and democracy nor has MKO any popular support within Iran; it enjoys much favor with exiles from the regime many of whom trust the group not the least but are after their own interests.

Being a tiny, unrepresentative minority, MKO would have difficulty retaining power even if it did gain some. Instead, it might go the way of other groups which Western countries have funded over the years: the group would continue its guerilla wars from the wilderness like Al Qaeda or would turn into dictators like Saddam, with whom the group shares exact similarities, whose tyranny would lead to terrible bloodbath. Can those who act as the voice of MKO to condemn executions in Iran accept the responsibility of bloods shed by the terrorist MKO?

mojahedin.ws – 14/08/2007

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